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Easy pavlova recipe

Easy pavlova recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Dessert
  • Meringue
  • Pavlova

Everyone loves a good Pavlova - and this recipe couldn't be simpler. Use other fruits instead of kiwi fruit, if desired.

1277 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 4 egg whites
  • 250g caster sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons cornflour
  • 475ml whipping cream, whipped
  • 6 kiwi fruits, peeled and sliced

MethodPrep:30min ›Cook:1hr ›Ready in:1hr30min

  1. Pre-heat oven to 150 C / Gas mark 2. Line a baking tray with baking parchment. Draw a 23cm (9 in) circle on the parchment.
  2. In a large bowl, beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Gradually add in the sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat until thick and glossy. Overbeaten egg whites lose volume and deflate when folded into other ingredients. Be absolutely sure not a particle of grease or egg yolk gets into the whites. Gently fold in vanilla extract, lemon juice and cornflour.
  3. Spoon mixture inside the circle drawn on the parchment. Working from the centre, spread mixture towards the outside edge, building edge slightly. This should leave a slight depression in the centre.
  4. Bake for 1 hour. Cool on a wire rack.
  5. Remove the parchment, and place meringue on a flat serving plate. Fill the centre of the meringue with whipped cream, sweetened if desired. Top whipped cream with kiwi fruit slices.

Tip:

To keep your meringue from being flat and grainy, try beating egg whites until stiff but not dry. Also, when beating in sugar, beat in about 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well between each addition. Then beat until meringue is thick, white and glossy. Be absolutely sure not a particle of grease or egg yolk gets into the whites.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(415)

Reviews in English (322)

Something else.I would leave it to cool in the oven after cooking time, switch oven off and leave for an hour to dry out-15 Oct 2010

Altered ingredient amounts.I used only 200 gm caster sugar & it tastes even better....-19 May 2010

Real easy to make n tastes fab! My first ever pavlova n it came out great... Hubby loves it too!!!-23 Jan 2011


Summer berry pavlova (Mary Berry)

This berry pavlova is the perfect showstopper dessert. It’s a simple make ahead dessert that is so easy even kids can help make it.

In the summer, my favourite dessert is a crisp meringue topped with cream and delicious summer berries. It’s a great dessert for summer BBQs and get togethers it’s perfect for sharing with friends and it’s the perfect dessert for kids to make as it’s so easy.

If you swap the fruit with something more seasonal like citrus fruits in the winter or autumnal blackberries and apple, it’s great dessert to make at any time of the year. And makes a wonderful dessert to share with friends and family for the holiday season.

We’ve made a few meringues before, but with meringue recipe from Mary Berry is my favourite. It turned out to have the perfect mixture of soft gooey marshmallow on the inside with a delicious crunch on the outside – everything a good pavlova should be (in my opinion).

How can kids help make this Mary Berry pavlova?

Meringues are easier than you think for kids to make. There are only a few ingredients and a few simple steps so it’s a great dessert for children to help make. Once you’ve separated the eggs, kids will enjoy whipping the eggs until they become light and fluffy. Mine were also very good at slowly adding the sugar, teaspoon at a time.

If you’re decorating the pavlova with soft summer fruits, children (even young children and toddlers) can practice their knife skills and chop some strawberries etc ready to decorate.

Useful equipment

You might need the following baking tools/gadgets to make this Mary Berry pavlova recipe.

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Difficulty: Easy

Time: 25 minutes plus 2 hours baking


Pavlova recipe

Pavlova is a traditional dessert in New Zealand and Australia. It is a recipe based on crispy meringue with a soft center and usually served with whipped cream and fresh fruit.

This makes it a fresh and light dessert, perfect for a summer lunch or any other occasion.

The perfect pavlova

The meringue of the pavlova is different from a classic meringue. Although the ingredients are the same, the latter after cooking gives a crispy texture, while in the meringue of the pavlova, cornstarch is added which gives it that marshmallow heart.

But ingredients are not everything! You also have to follow the recipe correctly, which consists of whipping the whites well and incorporating the sugar at the right time and gradually to obtain a perfect meringue. And thus avoid having worries of hollow meringue, or cracked.

As you can see, to obtain the perfect texture of crispy meringue with a soft center. You will have to follow the preparation instructions and as a bonus I share with you my 6 tips to make a successful pavlova.



Seasonality and ingredients for a perfect pavlova recipe

In its countries of origin, pavlova is often eaten in the hot months of summer. This means that Australians and New Zealanders usually enjoy it around Christmastime!

In any case, this cake is best to be served in the hot months of summer as it is quite fresh. It is eaten cold and the whipped cream plus fresh berries will give the exact right amount of freshness for a hot summer. The sugary meringue does fit for other times of the year too, so feel free to ignore the seasonality and just make it whenever, but without the fresh berries of course. Following this pavlova recipe, you will have a perfect dessert that you will want to eat more and more of.

As said, the ingredients for this pavlova recipe are quite summery. The base of the cake is made of meringue and it&rsquos extremely important to follow each step of the recipe very carefully because any mistake can affect the way the batter is spread on the baking paper, which will then affect the shape of the cake. Making the meringue is very easy and we will only need sugar and egg whites at first, then adding cornstarch, vanilla sugar, and vinegar (the last three in very small amounts).

On top, we added whipped cream and berries. You are free to change the toppings of this recipe but we highly recommend the ones we used. Any fruit or berry works great with whipped cream!

A picture of our pavlova cake from the top


Making pavlova in advance

This dish can be made ahead! However, meringue does not keep well in humid weather so make sure to assemble your pavlova right before eating.

That being said – Without toppings, you can safely leave your pavlova overnight in the oven (after it has been baked and the oven is turned off, of course) to be decorated in the morning – this will also help with your pavlova to set without cracking or collapsing. You can store it in the fridge overnight, but this will cause it to absorb moisture from the air and lose its crispness.


Instructions

Preheat the oven to 160°C/Fan 140°C/gas 3. Lay a sheet of non-stick baking parchment on a baking sheet and mark a 23cm (9in) circle on it.

Put the egg whites into a large bowl and whisk until stiff and cloud-like. Add the sugar a teaspoonful at a time, whisking well after each addition, until all the sugar has been added. Blend the cornflour and vinegar together and whisk into the meringue mixture. Spread the meringue out to cover the circle on the non-stick baking parchment, building up the sides so they are higher than the middle.

Place in the oven but immediately reduce the temperature to 150°C/300°F/gas 2. Bake for about 1 hour until firm to the touch and a pale beige colour. Turn the oven off and allow the Pavlova to become quite cold while still in the oven. If you keep the oven door closed you will encourage a more marshmallowy meringue.

Remove the cold Pavlova from the baking sheet and parchment and slide onto a serving plate. Top with the whipped cream and strawberries, then chill in the fridge for 1 hour before serving.


Recipe: Easy pavlova

A pavlova -- a baked meringue cake -- is topped with whipped cream and sliced peaches, mango, kiwi and blueberries.

4 large egg whites, room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.

Using a stand mixer or handheld mixer, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form, about 4 minutes. Add sugar in two additions, beating on high until glossy, stiff peaks form, about 2 more minutes. Add vanilla, cream of tartar and cornstarch. Beat briefly to incorporate.

Spread meringue in a 9-inch circle. (Using a cake pan, you can trace the circle on parchment paper, then turn the paper over and spread meringue.) Make edges tall and a dip in the center.

Place pavlova in the oven and immediately reduce heat to 200 degrees. Bake until dry, about 90 minutes. Turn off the oven and let the pavlova cool inside the oven. When pavlova is cool, you may top and serve it. If not using immediately, store it tightly, covered, at room temperature for up to 2 days.

Note: While most pavlova recipes call for the addition of vinegar, this uses cream of tartar. Both acids help the egg whites hold onto the air and prevent collapsing. If you don&rsquot have cream of tartar, use 1 teaspoon of white vinegar, which will not impart a flavor to the pavlova. This recipe made a pavlova that was crisp on the outside and slightly chewy on inside.


Easy Pavlova Recipe

What is pavlova? Pavlova is a dessert popular in New Zealand and Australia. It’s not as common here in the states, but I hope to help change that!

In this elegant dessert Pavlova, a crisp white meringue layer is filled with whipped cream and fresh fruit. To keep your meringue from being flat and grainy, try beating egg whites until stiff but not dry. Overbeaten egg whites lose volume and deflate when folded into other ingredients pavlova. Also, when beating in sugar, beat in about 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well between each addition. Then beat until meringue is thick, white and glossy. Be absolutely sure not a particle of grease or egg yolk gets into the whites.

Pavlova Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 egg whites
  • 1 1/4 cups white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 pint heavy cream
  • 6 kiwi, peeled and sliced

DirectionsPreheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Draw a 9-inch circle on the parchment paper.

In a large bowl, beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Gradually add in the sugar, about 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat until thick and glossy. Gently fold in vanilla extract, lemon juice, and cornstarch.

Spoon mixture inside the circle drawn on the parchment paper. Working from the center, spread mixture pavlova toward the outside edge, building edge slightly. This should leave a slight depression in the center.

Bake pavlova for 1 hour. Cool on a wire rack.

In a small bowl, beat heavy cream until stiff peaks form set aside. Remove the paper, and place meringue on a flat serving plate. Fill the center of the meringue with whipped cream, and top with kiwifruit slices.

Notes
Pavlova is best enjoyed right after it’s garnished. It doesn’t freeze well.


Strawberry Pavlova Recipe

A beautiful and easy-to-make Strawberry Pavlova Recipe. Delicious meringue is covered in whipped cream, fresh strawberries and a scattering of pistachios.

“I oversee the food and drink publishing at Chronicle Books in San Francisco.” I didn’t get it. I thought I was being pranked. My memory heaved me back to a few months prior. I sat alone on the outskirts of Riverside Park, umbrella in hand, where I suavely obnoxiously laid a copy of that morning’s New York Times on the sodden bench. The fog was as thick as stiffly whipped meringue for a pavlova, the air smelled of dog breath and gasoline, and the trusty automatic umbrella I had since middle school graduation saw better days. Despite it all, I patiently waited it out to take a phone call from an acquaintance at a big publishing house there in the city. I was excited I wanted to write a cookbook and I wanted to hear her honest opinion about what I should do next. After I stupidly confused the honks of several yellow cabs for my ringtone, my chunky silver flip phone vibrated and Pocketful of Sunshine pierced the humid September air as I shuffled to compose myself, “HELLO!” (we’ll get to this strawberry pavlova in a minute).

The phone call was brief she told me to contact her about writing a book when I achieved near-impossible (in my mind) numerical fetes. I knew it was a safe bet, and the right thing to do. After all, she’s the editor at a prestigious publishing house and knows better. In spite of that, what I heard felt like a firm, wind-lugging blow to the stomach . . . I suck at math, and numbers are always the last thing I want to focus on. I just wanted a chance. Despite the conversation, I stubbornly refused to let my dream disappear into the smog I kept it in the back of my mind. I kept this pavlova on my heart.

I shuddered, and my mind transported me back to New Jersey I was caught off-guard by that email. I scooped up my laptop and barreled into my Mom’s bedroom. “Mom, I need you to read this out loud.” The harsh smell of nail polish waved past my nose. She’d just painted her fingernails a vibrant strawberry red (it inspired this strawberry pavlova), “Hand those to me, please.” She signaled for her glasses, and carefully slid them onto her face using the pads of her fingers.

I placed the computer on her lap, and pointed at where to read, “I oversee the food and drink publishing at Chronicle Books . . . I’m sure you’re plenty busy, but if you want to chat about book ideas give me a shout.”
“Mom.” I looked at her, wide-eyed.
“Kamran, they want you to write a book! Is this real? I swear to God, you’d better email her back.”

I felt my lips quiver, my heart drop, and tears fill my eyes. It was as if one of Scheherazade’s genies spiraled into my life like a veil of spun sugar, ready to grant three wishes after centuries of imprisonment. The universe spoke and it was in my favor I was going to write a book.

Fast forwarding past the meetings, emails, phone calls, and contracts, I finally had a concept ready. It was an instructional on everything I loved to cook and bake— a risky idea I was set on. They weren’t sold on the concept it was back to the drawing board for me, and my new instructions were to do something I didn’t dare want to think about doing: a baking book. With these and pretzels and chocolate cake and strawberry pavlova. It was a scary task I felt was best left to the people who’ve been doing it well for a long time— people like David and Mary Berry.

After a lot of brainstorming and a tight deadline floating over my head, I declared I’d write a book on baking, not a baking book. I feel like the whole point of writing a book is to write something you want to read. I may have confused you a bit on the whole “baking book versus book on baking” bit there’s a difference in my eyes. A baking book is simply a book with recipes: an instructional, a textbook lacking in personality. It’s baking books that people fear, and I didn’t want to add to them. Hand Made Baking is a book about baking.

Baking has always been my form of unwinding. It’s my therapy and the ultimate means in which I can express my love and care for others. Sharing something delicious, made with your hands— that’s the true essence of baking. Baking isn’t meant to be feared, but rather embraced. Hand Made Baking, from the moment the idea smacked me upside the head, was to embody that with sharing and confidence-building being at the center of it all.

Hand Made Baking is my love letter to you. It’s a love letter in which I’ve revivified the past and left all assumptions behind. Whether you’re making this pavlova recipe, my nostalgic Nancy Drew Blondies or something as charming as my Caribbean Princess Cake, I’m there guiding you through each step. You won’t find conventional chemistry equation-like recipes in this book. Because there’s so much I don’t have control of, I am a maniac about the details I can control, and thankfully I was given the freedom to do what I felt is right. I wanted the recipes to be approachable no matter where you are in the world no matter if you’re using cup measurements or a kitchen scale. All of the ingredients are measured appropriately for you.

There’s no proper break-down of the book anywhere online, and I want to give it to you here.

Hand Made Baking is broken down as such:

– There’s the Introduction — no explanation needed here.

– After the introduction, comes Kitchen Basics . Kitchen basics is a section dedicated to informing you about anything and everything you might need while making the recipes from the book. I give alternatives, various brand names, and my personal favorites to help you decide what to get when you’re stocking up on baking equipment.

– Next is what I like to regard as one of the most important sections of the book— Before you Begin . I liken this part of the book to grandmotherly guidance– it’s far from patronizing it’s more like friendly baking advice from . . . your sweet grandmother (I know, I know. I’m a dude. Let’s pretend I’m one of the Golden Girls, for the sake of making a point, shall we?). It’s everything you need to know about your oven, baking times, a reminder to check expiration dates, and how to measure accurately– essential, especially if you’re using cups.

– Then comes the recipe chapters— Rise and Shine (breakfast), As Easy as 1-2-3 (pie and pastries), Three O’Clock (cookies of all sorts), Piece of Cake (cakes galore), and Spread a Little Butter on That! (breads). Every recipe in the book has at least one photo accompanying it. And those recipes requiring visual guidance, have just that— multiple photos displaying those techniques.

At the core of Hand Made Baking is good, honest recipes for bakers of all ranks. This Strawberry Pavlova is one of my favorites from the book. I’ve tweaked it a bit for the sake of celebrating a long journey— smog, strawberry red nail polish, and revivification. Give it a try I know you won’t be disappointed.

If you’re interested in ordering a copy of the book, I’ve included all the details below (book trailer and another delicious post to come soon!).


    1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Draw a 9-inch circle on the parchment paper.
    2. In a large bowl, beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Gradually add in the sugar, about 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat until thick and glossy. Gently fold in vanilla extract, lemon juice, and cornstarch.
    3. Spoon mixture inside the circle drawn on the parchment paper. Working from the center, spread mixture toward the outside edge, building edge slightly. This should leave a slight depression in the center.
    4. Bake for 1 hour. Cool on a wire rack.
    5. In a small bowl, beat heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Set aside. Remove the paper, and place meringue on a flat serving plate. Fill the center of the meringue with whipped cream, and top with kiwifruit slices.
    6. Note: Other fresh fruit may be substituted for kiwi, like sliced strawberries, pineapple, mango, or a combination thereof.
    7. Note: If you prefer sweetened whipped cream, you may add two teaspoons of sugar while whipping the cream, or to taste.

    This is a wonderful light & airy dessert. Ideal after eating a heavier meal. The fresh fruit is the perfect complement for such a sweet treat. I remember tasting a dessert similiar to this in Paris, France called the Chantilly. Later, my cuban mother-in-law taught me how to make Merenguitos which are bite size meringue cookies. I now can add Pavlova to my list. If you are a meringue lover this is a must try recipe.

    I'm from Australia and this recipe reminded me of the Pavlova my Grandma made. The only thing it was missing was passionfruit but I could not find it at my local supermarket. I was afraid it may not turn out because I live at a high altitude, so I reduced the heat to 275F and cooked for 5 or so min longer but it turned out fine. The only problem I had was that it got stuck to the pan and paper, I think next time I will use a dusting of cornstarch on the paper. However, all who ate it loved it. It tasted very authentic and I will make this one again, a great summer dessert.

    I made this about a month ago but never got a chance to review. They were delightful! I turned mine into individual size servings and left them to cool overnight in the oven. However the next day they did crack like mad and the centres had a more marshmallowy consistancy then they should. Solution. I placed them in the refrigerator for a couple of hours! I think the moist air helped to turn them into the fluffy little pieces of heaven they should be!

    I made mini pavs, then filled with some leftover cream cheese frosting I had, topped with strawberries & blueberries and fresh whipped cream. I made a strawberry sauce for the plate. Sugar overload!! (But so good. ) I also took the advice to crumple up some parchment, dust with cornstarch, then make the pavs on top. Didn't stick at all!

    Brought this to a birthday party. It was the only thing the birthday girl ate (she's 83!) I win!! Thanks to you and this delicious recipe. Really easy to make but looks like you spent hours. Be sure and splash some flour on your face to make it look hard. Bravo!

    Pavlova is one of my favourite desserts and I have always wanted to try making it, but have always been a bit scared. This lived up to it's name, it was easy. I reduced the amount of sugar in the egg white mix to one cup which was plenty sweet enough. Before spreading the pavlova I lightly dusted the parchment paper with cornstarch to prevent sticking. I used canned peaches and fresh strwawberries as I couldn't get kiwis. My guests were very impressed. Many Thanks.

    FANTASTIC. Growing up in Australia this dish was part of our national identity, but here in the US I could just never get it right. This recipe is just as it should be. We always let this dish cool in the oven - just turn the oven off at the end of the cooking time and leave it there (even overnight!). For those who may have found that it sometimes sticks, in Australia we would coat the paper with a thin dusting of corn starch before spooning the mix onto the baking tray.



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