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Would You Ever Eat a Chicken Ice Pop?

Would You Ever Eat a Chicken Ice Pop?


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Thanks, but no thanks, we think we’ll stick to our cherry ice pops.

Heat got you down? Why not cool off with a chicken ice pop? At the Zenyaren restaurant in Tokyo, owners are trying to help customers beat Japan’s massive heatwave this summer by offering chicken ice pops. Basically, the restaurant encloses their chicken skewers known as yakitori in frozen collagen. Customers can munch on the chicken pops like they would any cherry or lemon ice pop.

The chicken is actually prepared normally but are slowly frozen in the blocks of gelatinous substance, so that they keep their smoky, barbecue flavor. Two pieces of frozen chicken will cost you approximately $4.17. If you can keep this chilly meat substance down, there are more benefits. Apparently the Japanese believe that collagen is healthy for the skin, although scientists have suggested that it has more of a placebo effect.

‘It is delicious especially when you are trying to keep cool on a hot day,” a fan of the ice lollys told Yahoo News UK. “Refreshing and nutritious at the same time, and great for your complexion.’

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter@JoannaFantozzi


How to Poach Chicken Breasts That Are Juicy and Delicious, Every Time

Poached chicken breasts are either offensively bad or transcendently good—and, sadly, the scale tips drastically in favor of the former. But that’s just because most people don't know how to poach chicken breasts properly. From this point forward, you will not be one of those people. You will poach chicken perfectly, leaving dry, chewy poached chicken in the rear view mirror.

But wait, what is poaching? It's a cooking method we mention a lot less frequently than roasting or frying or grilling. To poach something is to cook it while submerged in a liquid at a low temperature (read: not boiling). That liquid could be oil, milk, or wine, but we most frequently poach in seasoned water.

Cooking chicken breast in water does not sound glamorous. And most of the time—when people overcook and mistreat their chicken—it isn’t. But the gentle, gradual heat that poaching provides can actually lead to one of the most tender, succulent, perfectly cooked pieces of white-meat chicken you’ll ever eat. Here’s how to nail it every time:

Start with 4 cups of cold water and 2 large chicken breasts (about 1 lb., 4 oz. total) in a sauce pan. (This ratio of water-to-meat is important larger breasts will take longer to cook, and smaller breasts will overcook more quickly. And if you want to cook more chicken, add another 2 cups of water per breast.) Cold water is key here, because it allows the chicken to cook way more gradually than it would if you just dumped them into already-boiling water.

Season the water with 3½ tsp. of kosher salt. This might seem like a ton of salt, but trust us. Only a portion of it ends up on the chicken. Seasoning your water aggressively ensures that your chicken will be well-seasoned and actually taste like. chicken. (But in a good way!)

Turn the heat to medium and bring the water to a gentle boil. As soon as you see the surface of the water start to roll, flip the breasts over with tongs, remove the pot from heat, and cover it with a tightly fitting lid. The chicken breasts will continue to cook gently in the hot water.

Once the chicken breasts register an internal temperature of 150° on the ol' instant read thermometer, remove them from the water. This will usually take about 5-10 minutes, but remember that it all depends on how large or small the chicken breasts are. Always check sooner than later if you're not sure—you can always cook them longer, but you can't uncook them.

Once you’ve removed them from the water, let them rest on a cutting board for at least five minutes. Then slice them up and throw them over rice, in a salad, or onto your grand aioli platter. Whatever you choose, you’ll be adding the best possible poached chicken breast you’ve ever cooked into the mix. In case you haven't noticed, you’re living on the transcendently good side of that scale we mentioned earlier. Welcome, friend: We've been expecting you.


Fried Chicken Ice Cream: The Summer Treat You Never EVER Knew You Needed

As if the world couldn’t get any weirder, meet fried chicken ice cream: the sweet yet salty delicious frozen treat made to look like fried chicken drumsticks.

Before you get too excited and think this is a way you can eat both ice cream and chicken at the same time, don’t let this bucket fool you. All nine pieces inside each KFC-like bucket are totally chicken-free &mdash it’s just a comedic play on the classic, delicious treat. And it ain’t even April Fools’ Day!

Courtesy of Goldbelly

The “Not Fried Chicken” ice cream bucket was created by pastry chef Cynthia Wong through Life Raft Treats, South Carolina&rsquos sole chef-driven artisan ice cream truck. All products are made with locally farmed ingredients and in this case, a wicked sense of humor.

Instead of using batter and deep fryers, Wong creates her sweet drumsticks by using decadent waffle ice cream coated in white chocolate and smashed cornflakes for that crunch you’re familiar with at your local fried chicken joint.

We know what you’re thinking, “but, what about the bone?”

Courtesy of Goldbelly

Oh, there’s a bone, baby. Don’t you worry. But instead of using an actual chicken bone, expect a chocolate-covered cookie stick ready for munching and crunching.

As mentioned, each faux-chick comes strewn inside a fried chicken box you’re going to have to make room for in your freezer. But, believe us: they’re worth it. Just try not to eat them all in one sitting. It’ll be hard, but we believe in you.

These buckets are perfect for a slew of events. A fun dessert at your kid’s high school graduation party, a delicious trick or a gift for dad on Father’s Day, a fun treat to sell at the next PTA bake sale or a simple snack everyone can get behind this summer. The options for eating these babies are endless

Looking to give them a chomp yourself? We knew you would. Right now, you can snag yourself a bucket of the “Not Fried Chicken” ice cream drumsticks for $99 on Goldbelly. Time to trick your taste buds all summer long.


Roast the chicken for 20 minutes per pound, plus 15 minutes. If you like crispier skin, start out at a temperature of 450 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes, then lower the heat to 350 degrees and continue to roast for 20 minutes per pound.

Remove the chicken from the oven and check the internal temperature using a meat thermometer. The temperature should read 165 degrees to indicate the chicken is thoroughly cooked. If not, continue roasting for five to 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 165 degrees. Juices should also run clear when the chicken is cooked.

Things You'll Need

For additional flavor, you can insert chopped onions, garlic cloves and fresh herbs into the cavity of the chicken before roasting.

Trussing the chicken, or tying it prior to roasting, is optional.

Roasting and frying are only recommended if your chicken is young. Older chickens are tough and should be cooked slowly, such as in the crock pot, over a period of several hours to soften the meat.


The Good Chicken Ice-Pops

Every summer the human makes me chicken ice-pops. If he posts it on the Instagramz he often receives lots of messages from people asking how he makes them… Well folks… Here it is!

Ingredients

Chicken (On The Bone)
Water
Rosemary
Thyme
Top Nomz

How To Make Them

Start off by getting some chicken (I like to use ‘the good chicken’ from Marks & Spencer) and pop it in the oven until it is cooked. Once the chicken cooked eat it all so that you are left with just the bones, skin and other bits that you don’t want. Put these in a pan with a pinch of rosemary and thyme.

Add the water and boil it all up for an hour or so.

Once its boiled for a bit turn off the hob and leave to cool. Once cool, sieve the bones and other little bits out so that you just have the tasty chicken stock left.

Pour the stock into your ice-lolly moulds.

Add some Top Nomz… about 3 or 4 (I’m adding some of ‘The Good Chicken Bites‘).


Fried Chicken Ice Cream: The Summer Treat You Never EVER Knew You Needed

As if the world couldn’t get any weirder, meet fried chicken ice cream: the sweet yet salty delicious frozen treat made to look like fried chicken drumsticks.

Before you get too excited and think this is a way you can eat both ice cream and chicken at the same time, don’t let this bucket fool you. All nine pieces inside each KFC-like bucket are totally chicken-free &mdash it’s just a comedic play on the classic, delicious treat. And it ain’t even April Fools’ Day!

Courtesy of Goldbelly

The “Not Fried Chicken” ice cream bucket was created by pastry chef Cynthia Wong through Life Raft Treats, South Carolina&rsquos sole chef-driven artisan ice cream truck. All products are made with locally farmed ingredients and in this case, a wicked sense of humor.

Instead of using batter and deep fryers, Wong creates her sweet drumsticks by using decadent waffle ice cream coated in white chocolate and smashed cornflakes for that crunch you’re familiar with at your local fried chicken joint.

We know what you’re thinking, “but, what about the bone?”

Courtesy of Goldbelly

Oh, there’s a bone, baby. Don’t you worry. But instead of using an actual chicken bone, expect a chocolate-covered cookie stick ready for munching and crunching.

As mentioned, each faux-chick comes strewn inside a fried chicken box you’re going to have to make room for in your freezer. But, believe us: they’re worth it. Just try not to eat them all in one sitting. It’ll be hard, but we believe in you.

These buckets are perfect for a slew of events. A fun dessert at your kid’s high school graduation party, a delicious trick or a gift for dad on Father’s Day, a fun treat to sell at the next PTA bake sale or a simple snack everyone can get behind this summer. The options for eating these babies are endless

Looking to give them a chomp yourself? We knew you would. Right now, you can snag yourself a bucket of the “Not Fried Chicken” ice cream drumsticks for $99 on Goldbelly. Time to trick your taste buds all summer long.


Don't Believe Your Eyes. That's Ice Cream, Not Fried Chicken

Is this the start of another deceptive dessert trend?

If there&aposs one thing to remember in this life, it&aposs that you shouldn&apost take everything you see, hear, or read on the internet at face value. Food-wise, the whole "things that don&apost look like cake but are, in fact, cake" saga was probably the best recent lesson in this regard. Now another viral treat making the rounds on Twitter looks to serve us an equally mind-blowing example of dessert deception. 

Think you&aposve got yourself a drumstick of fried chicken? Well, think again.

What you&aposre looking at is Not Fried Chicken. No, literally — it&aposs Not Fried Chicken Ice Cream, made by Life Raft Treats. The brainchild of Cynthia Wong, a six-time finalist for the James Beard Awards&apos honor of Outstanding Pastry Chef, this frozen riff on fried chicken finds her applying her whimsical eye and gifted hands to a humorous new form. 

So if it&aposs Not Fried Chicken, what is it? According to a product listing on Goldbelly, Not Fried Chicken starts with waffle-flavored ice cream and "batters" it with a coating of white chocolate and crushed corn flakes. To really drive the point home, each drumstick also includes a chocolate-covered cookie "bone," making the first time that a chicken bone is not only safe to eat, but actually delicious. The drumsticks are also made with local dairy and eggs, which really adds a new wrinkle to the age-old chicken-egg conundrum. 

Fittingly, Not Fried Chicken Ice Cream is sold on Life Raft Treats&apos "chef-driven artisan ice cream truck" in South Carolina, but those who live further away can also get their hands on a bucket of the good stuff thanks to Goldbelly&aposs mission of delivering rarities like this far and wide. It will set you back $99 for nine pieces, but at least you&aposre working with free shipping. 

So if you&aposve always been curious about what "fried chicken" would be like as a dessert, want a fancy version of a Nestle Drumstick, or have a lot of money set aside for messing with your friends and family, it&aposs time to say "yes" to Not Fried Chicken. 


Palios fried Chicken/Snack City Cuban Ice Cream (Tampa)

Two friends invited me to accompany them to dinner the other day. One—whom we’ll call “Jimbo” to protect the guilty—had found the best fried chicken he’d ever eaten. I was not surprised when he said he found the best golden-brown bird at the Palios brothers’ fry shack on MacDill. Our mutual friend “Adam” is one of those poor souls condemned to eternal health food and rice cakes for medical reasons. The doctor makes the rules, and Adam’s vigilant wife enforces them.

Jimbo had learned that Adam’s wife would be out of town on this night and he discreetly called him to arrange our meeting. I fasted in preparation, and I’m sure my buddies did, too. Unfortunately for Adam, he had a doctor’s appointment the next morning, in part to have his cholesterol tested.

Walking into Palios—which is named after the brothers who run it—is like taking a few steps back in time. The board on the wall displays their entire menu, almost all of which is fried. Fried chicken, fried shrimp, onion rings, etc., all served with Cole slaw and French fries. For those wary of grease, they make a good Greek salad, too. The only proof that time has elapsed in the building is the prices on the hand-painted board. When decades of cost of living increases forced them to raise prices, the brothers nailed new boards over the old prices rather than paint them over again.

Jimbo and I started off with some great onion rings while we waited for Adam. We did not have to wait long—Adam could hardly contain himself. We ordered a big plate of chicken and Adam ate the crumbs of the onion rings directly off the table, relishing the only grease he’d tasted in many months.

Then, the chicken arrived and we dove in. The most striking thing about Palios’ chicken is the slightly burnt flavor that lends a bold heartiness where there normally would be simple breaded saltiness. The best fried chicken is not uniformly cooked, but has slightly burnt edges around the browned surface. Although I suspect it is deep-fried, their chicken tastes more like it comes from mom’s cast iron skillet, and everyone should know that taste at least once.

Before long, we sat wiping the grease from our lips, eyes rolling back in bliss. Adam could not resist eating the crumbs from the table once again. We had not even finished lavishing praise on Palios’ fried chicken when Jimbo suggested another indulgence, ice cream. “The place looks like a 7-11,” Jimbo said of the store he had in mind, “but they have great Cuban ice cream. Do you want to go?” Without a tinge of guilt, newly-liberated Adam nodded, and we were off, a two-car convoy on a classified mission to indulge in Cuban ice cream.

Snack City is a simple-looking store, an utterly unremarkable structure at Howard and Columbus that one can drive by without so much as a glance. Even inside, the building looks slightly run-down with a few tables and a counter. The robust, friendly man behind the counter had just finished taking an order for one hundred one-gallon buckets of mango ice cream from an Indian gentleman. “People from India are crazy about mangoes,” Jimbo quipped. When asked about the ice cream, the Indian gentleman said simply, “It is the best I’ve had.” His massive order would supply a party he planned on throwing. Images of a vast ice cream orgy sprung to mind, except that the participants would be fully clothed and the moans would be mango-induced.

There are many flavors to choose from, but Jimbo insisted we try the maméy (pronounced ma-meh) flavor, derived from a Cuban fruit of the same name. Maméy is considered to be Cuba’s national fruit, and looks somewhat like an avocado with a red interior. The ice cream resembles a pink sorbet, with a subtle and intriguing flavor, somewhat like guava and not too sweet. After hearing the Indian man’s praise, we tried some mango as well. The mango and maméy contrasted each other in glorious fashion, but shared qualities delicate and delicious, light and refreshing. Cuban ice cream is neither as sweet nor as creamy as its counterpart here in the U.S. Unlike the decadence of American Heath Bar Crunch and Cookies ‘n’ Cream flavors, Snack City offers ice cream made with dignity and restraint that seems to touch off subtle possibilities instead of cloying extremes.

We thought we’d done it all at Palios, but Snack City offered something more exotic and slightly less sinful. Once again with our eyes rolling about, Adam and I thanked Jimbo for the generous invitation to explore Tampa’s culinary delights.

In parting, Adam said, “After all this, I think I’m going to reschedule my doctor’s appointment.” He rescheduled the appointment for one week later. His cholesterol went through the ceiling, but it sure tasted good.


Salty ice cream

Not all ice cream recipes for “man’s best friend” are based on yogurt. Often, dog ice cream is not as sweet as human ice cream or may not have sugar added. A “traditional” preparation of a salty dessert, which is regularly prepared by dog owners, is chicken ice cream.

To prepare a salty dog ice cream, first prepare a chicken broth, and then add pieces of chicken meat (not including the bones). Pop the concoction in the refrigerator for a few hours before serving to your dog.

As an extra treat, you can add pieces of low-salt ham or sausage on top.


Meatballs Are A Must

We love meatballs so much, we also included them in our Flat Belly Meal Plan for a Healthy Week. Roll up some lean turkey meatballs on a Sunday, refrigerate until cool, freeze on a baking tray (to keep them from sticking together in the bag), and then transfer to a plastic zip-top bag once chilled. Pull them out to add a boost of protein to your meal whenever the only thing left in your pantry is a box of pasta.



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